Kuruthi – A Bold Potrayal of the Communal Coterie

The story of hatred can be traced back to the two sons of Adam- Habil and Qabil. One of them fought against the other and killed him out of envy and transgression, because of the bounty that Allah gave his brother and because the sacrifice that he sincerely offered to Allah was accepted. The afresh […]

The story of hatred can be traced back to the two sons of Adam- Habil and Qabil. One of them fought against the other and killed him out of envy and transgression, because of the bounty that Allah gave his brother and because the sacrifice that he sincerely offered to Allah was accepted.

The afresh Amazon Prime premiere Kuruthi explores this immortal fact. Prithviraj Sukumaran’s Kuruthi is a mirror that makes way for a self-evaluation to the audience of the seeds of hatred sown in us throughout our life by our society, religion and politics. The movie, with story and screenplay by Anish Pallyal and directed by Manu Warrier, revolves around the incidents which happened over 24 hours in a house. The movie is a must-watch thriller themed around the communal dynamics in our country.

Ibrahim (Roshan Mathew) is an ordinary rubber tapper in Erattupetta, Kerala with his wife Zeenath, daughter Zuhru, his father Moosa Khader (Mamukkoya) and brother Resul (Naslen). Ibrahim loses his daughter and wife during a landslide in the village. The movie revolves around this family and their neighbours Preman (Manikantan) and Suma (Shrinda). Things take a turn, when S.I Sathyan (Murali Gopy) jostles into Ibrahim’s house on a dingy night, with a murder accused. The fuel further flamed when the family encountered Laiq, essayed by Prithviraj on the same night.

Here, the slow-paced movie shifts gear to move gripping. From here onwards, the normal life of Ibru and others gets a tinge of communalism and loyalties get questioned. It challenges the viewers also with a dilemma whether to take sides or be objective. When the characters stuck inside the house are faced with dilemmas, their true communal and political views kick in and it further unfolds unpredictable twists.

The whole cast and crew have done just to the movie. Prithviraj, Roshan, Srindaa made their jobs perfect. But, Mamukkoya and Murali Gopy needs special acclaim for their subtlety. Abinandhan Ramanujam’s cinematography and music, composed by Jakes Bejoy, add more life.

Kuruthi is a brave film that discusses the conflict between majoritarian sentiment and the alienation of minorities, in the backdrop of communalisation of society. The film should be applauded for not taking sides and yet brilliantly conveying the message. Kuruthi leaves us with a powerful message of how the human race is contrived by the brewing hatred in society. Kuruthi is a bold film to watch for the same reason.